The Different Types of Tango

Tango has always been included in the standard dance program, regardless of either its Argentinian spirit or the cultural-social context in which it originated. If we take a little more interest in the history of this dance, we might have a lot of questions about the different versions of it. Why are we still dancing […]

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The Different Types of Tango

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Tango has always been included in the standard dance program, regardless of either its Argentinian spirit or the cultural-social context in which it originated. If we take a little more interest in the history of this dance, we might have a lot of questions about the different versions of it. Why are we still dancing tango of the 50s today? Why are there so many different styles of tango? How...

Tango has always been included in the standard dance program, regardless of either its Argentinian spirit or the cultural-social context in which it originated. If we take a little more interest in the history of this dance, we might have a lot of questions about the different versions of it. Why are we still dancing tango of the 50s today? Why are there so many different styles of tango? How and why did they appear? What are they called? What is salón tango? These questions are difficult, and the answers might be a little confusing.

Tango Is Not Equal to Tango

According to well-known tango teachers, there are two main types of tango: Argentinian and European also known as sports tango. They are very different from each other. Sport dances do not have the seductive steps that are typical of Argentinian tango. All standard sport dances have a certain posture that limits eye contact. Dance experts add that European tango is danced at the same height, strictly following the vertical axis of the bodies, in other words this type of tango is danced without ups and downs. Speed and pace requirements are also important. They characterize the dance temperament. Argentinian tango contains many emotions and passions that are expressed in feelings and in free body movements. Meanwhile, European tango has a lot of limitations and rules, that leave little room for feelings here.

Intimacy Is a Distinctive Feature

Although these two types of tango are very different, there are still a number of advantages between them. As the dance teachers say, the most important and distinctive feature of tango is the close posture. The partners feel a closer connection to each other than when they are dancing a waltz, quickstep, or foxtrot. Here the body comes in contact with another body and this creates a certain intimacy. In addition to the close contact of the dancers, music is also important. Both Argentinian and European tango music are similar. It is not difficult to distinguish the passionate sound of violin, piano and accordion, which over time has become inseparable from the movements of the tango.

Tango Of 50’s

A significant change in the style of Argentinian tango took place in the 1950s. It was started by the wonderful and innovative dancer Carlos Alberto Estevez, nicknamed Petróleo. This testifies that even to the dancers of the previous era, Petróleo’s ideas seemed strange at first. At that time, the now almost extinct canyengue-style tango still prevailed, greatly influenced by old macho ideals: a leaning posture, mysterious, and confident man emphasizing laziness by keeping his left hand quite low or even in his pocket. The woman then held her right hand on the hip. Particularly characteristic of the canyenge style was the variety of steps: numerous ganchos, intertwined legs, constant syncope. Petróleo’s steps were more subtle. He straightened the stagnant posture and emphasized eye contact. As a result, the dance looked more elegant. Thus, was born the modern salón tango. Elegant, soft, smooth walking has become a criterion for good dance. This is how

Tango Of 50’s
Tango Of 50’s